Mediterranean potato bake with prosciutto wrapped cod

Mediterranean bake with parma ham wrapped fish

This is one of those ‘bung in what you’ve got’ recipes that was good enough to keep and write down.  It is probably out there on the interweb in some form, but in my head it came from a desire to use up some of a packet of prosciutto, a couple of fish fillets and some new potatoes.  I imagined the ham wrapped fish nestling on a spicy potato stew, somewhat like patatas bravas.  Hence I’m going with the word ‘Mediterranean’ in the title.  Poor thing doesn’t know where it’s really from…  You can, of course, use any firm white fish that comes thick enough to wrap with the prosciutto.  Whatever is fresh, ethically sourced and a good price on the day you buy.  This is also another good way to use up leftover boiled new potatoes.  I rarely boil half a bag, as I figure if I cook them all in one go I’m saving energy and getting C and myself that much closer to a finished meal.  Another thing I’d say is that although black olives look prettier in the finished dish (you can’t see the green ones in the photo above now, can you?) you should put in either what you have or what you prefer.  I’m ALL about fat, green olives.  So that is often what is knocking around in my fridge.  The choice is yours though.  This is super quick to knock up and makes a nice change from the grilled fish, new potato, steamed veg combo I seem to make 90% of the time!

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Tuna pasta (yes really…)

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Adapted from Baby-led Weaning Cookbook by Gill Rapley & Tracey Murkett

How to start this post without sounding a little bit crazy.  Ummmm.  Yes I am posting tuna pasta made from standard store cupboard ingredients.  Surely, you are all thinking, this is the sort of thing EVERYONE already knows how to make.  But I have a defence, and this is it.  I love tuna pasta for a multitude of reasons, but not in an eat it every day kind of way.  I love it for its practicality.  Today the child and I arrived home from our social whirl at 5pm exactly.  Our usual mealtime is 5:30pm, give or take, and she goes to bed around 7pm.  I needed to get a meal on the table in good time for her to eat it and digest it before I could expect her to be able to sleep.  Who sleeps well on a full stomach?  I could have faffed about with the fresh salmon I had in the fridge, but my heart wasn’t in it.  Tuna pasta takes 20 minutes and today some semblance of our routine has remained intact.  That is in itself a minor miracle.  Secondly, as long as you have the pasta, the tuna and something tomatoey you’re good to go.  The permutations are endless, and you can be as fancy, or not, as you like.  You can spend more and dress it up, or buy value ingredients and be frugal.   Add extra veg to the sauce, or a side salad, or garlic bread, or cheese.  You can make it your own!  Thirdly, there will be people out there who just won’t know how to do this, for whatever reason, or have just forgotten how versatile and relatively good for you it is.  Lastly, I’ve been making a version of this since I was a student (so that’s a whole long time!) and it’s still working for me.  This particular one since I started feeding solid food to my child two years ago, hence my link to where I adapted it from.  Fads come and go, but this endures.  And you can feed it to kids.  And you could feed it to mates who pop over unexpectedly.  And it will feed you when you’re just too tired to do anything else because chances are you will always have these things in your kitchen.  So I’m bigging up tuna pasta – it rocks.

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